Category: CSO

We want your feedback! Open house on January 28th

You’re invited to attend an open house to view proposed concept designs for the next phase of improvements in the North East Exchange District. This includes the new design for John Hirsh Place, in preparation for the 2017 Canada Games

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CSO Master Plan Preliminary Proposal and Recommendation

On December 18, 2015, we submitted the CSO Master Plan Preliminary Proposal to the Province, including our recommendation of what control limit to set for combined sewer overflows (CSOs). Setting a control limit is an important measure to protect our

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How are CSO controls measured?

There are two ways to measure the impact of CSO reductions: reducing the frequency, or number of occurrences, of untreated overflows, which relates to the number of days the river has high bacterial counts; and reducing the volume of untreated

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What are the potential ways that we can implement CSO control strategies?

There are numerous ways in which combined sewer overflows strategies can be implemented. In most cases CSO control strategies incorporate numerous components of grey and green infrastructure, both large and small scale projects, and smaller targeted improvements. One approach to

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What would happen if we fully separated sewers?

Combined sewer systems are designed to collect both land drainage (rainwater and snowmelt) and wastewater (sewage from homes and businesses) in the same pipe. Right now, combined sewers make up 32% of the total sewer system. If we fully separated

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How does the implementation time impact the CSO Master Plan?

Implementing control strategies quicker allows for benefits to be realised sooner. However, the time it takes to implement the CSO Master Plan can significantly impact other aspects of the project. The greatest impact of a more rapid implementation of the

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Does reducing CSOs have an impact on the sewage treatment plants?

If we diverted all runoff from the CSO districts to a sewage treatment plant with our current infrastructure, it would have such significant impacts that it would be difficult to manage. First is the issue of capacity. Runoff collected during

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How does the CSO Licence fit with the other Environment Licences issued by the Province of Manitoba?

Major sewer projects, as well as the CSO Master Plan, are regulated through the provincial government by environment licences. Each of the projects associated with the different licences have significant costs associated with implementing them: West End Sewage Treatment Plant

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How does the CSO Master Plan fit into other City priorities?

The CSO Master Plan is a plan that will help us do our part to protect the long term health of our rivers and lakes. The City is committed to developing a plan to reduce the effects of CSOs on

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What are local businesses and industries doing to help address CSOs?

 Addressing CSOs needs everyone to do their part, including local businesses and industries. Wastewater discharges are regulated by the City of Winnipeg’s Sewer By-Law 92/2010, along with other Provincial regulations. The Sewer By-Law outlines strict restrictions on what businesses and

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How will implementing CSO control strategies impact my neighbourhood?

The amount of construction in a combined sewer area depends on the control strategies used. Most construction activity will likely cause only localized traffic disruptions, such as is common for current sewer renewals. Some control strategies like end-of-pipe treatment could

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How much will it cost to reduce CSOs?

The cost of implementing CSO control strategies will depend on various factors, including the level of control CSOs will be regulated to meet, the control strategies selected, and the timeframe over which the Master Plan is implemented. Estimates found in

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How do CSOs impact our rivers?

CSOs discharge diluted wastewater into the rivers that can result in visible floatables, such as floating debris. There is also the potential for odour when the volume discharging into the rivers is great enough. In order to address these problems,

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How does the CSO Master Plan align with OurWinnipeg?

OurWinnipeg, and its associated document, Sustainable Water and Waste Directional Strategy, guide the growth and change for the City. The strategy addresses environmental, economic and social sustainability and provides a path to guide infrastructure needs into the future. The CSO

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What are the effects of CSOs on Lake Winnipeg?

Lake Winnipeg has a very large watershed that drains Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Northwest Ontario, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and Northwestern Minnesota. The drainage area exceeds 982,000 km2, where much of it is intensively cultivated agricultural lands. Many cities (e.g.

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How do CSO control strategies impact basement flooding?

Heavy rainstorms result in large volumes of runoff and can overwhelm combined sewer systems. Overloaded sewers can back up through house sewer lines and flow into basements that aren’t protected. Any additional water removed from the system through using CSO

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How does development impact CSOs?

Development in combined sewer districts can potentially increase the amount of impervious surfaces, such as laying concrete on previously grassy areas. Impervious areas reduce the rate at which water soaks into the soil, increasing the amount of runoff entering the

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What can I do to help reduce CSOs?

There are several things you can do around the home or at your business to help reduce CSOs: Use rain barrels to capture rain from downspouts, reusing it to water gardens and lawns. Plant trees, shrubs, and other vegetation; the

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How can a green infrastructure approach help with CSOs?

Green infrastructure can delay or divert the amount of runoff entering the combined sewer system during wet weather events. They also bring several secondary benefits such as filtering pollutants from runoff, neighbourhood beautification, improved air quality, and improved wildlife habitat.

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What are other cities doing to address CSOs?

Many cities across North America, particularly areas built between 1880 and 1960, are dealing with the impacts of combined sewers. There are over 800 communities in Canada and the USA that have combined sewers. To address CSOs, municipalities develop plans

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What is usually done to address CSOs?

Many cities across North America, particularly those built between 1880 and 1960, are working towards managing their combined sewers overflows (CSOs). There are over 800 communities in Canada and the U.S. that have combined sewers. Provincial governments are regulating CSOs

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Are there conditions that are unique to Winnipeg that affect CSOs?

There are three main things that are unique; topography, soil and climate. The Red River Valley, which Winnipeg lies at the heart of, has an extremely flat topography. Flat land tends to drain poorly providing challenges for surface drainage from

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How are CSOs regulated?

The sewer system, which includes combined sewers, falls under the jurisdiction of the Environment Act for the Province of Manitoba.  CSOs are regulated by the Province of Manitoba through Environment Act Licence No. 3042. The intent of these regulations is

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What are combined sewer overflows?

Combined sewers are a single pipe system, built between 1880’s and 1960’s, designed to carry both wastewater (sewage from homes and businesses) and land drainage water (rain and snowmelt). During dry weather, all flow in the combined sewers are sent

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